Archive for the 'stroke' Category

01
Aug
16

JNF Awards $60,000 at 2016 SNIS Annual Meeting

The Joe Niekro Foundation was pleased to award $60,000 in research seed grants at the 2016 SNIS Annual Meeting in Boston this July. Among a pool of thirteen amazing applications, the Grants Review Board selected three to each receive a $20,000 seed grant that advances the study of brain aneurysms or brain arteriovenous malformations. The grants enable investigators to conduct research projects that address a specific hypotheses and generate preliminary data in preparation for major grant applications to corporations, foundations and governmental agencies. Founder of the Joe Niekro Foundation, Natalie Niekro and Treasurer of the SNIS Foundation, Richard Klucznik, MD presented each recipient with their checks.
We applaud all those that applied and look forward to granting additional dollars at the 2017 Annual Meeting in Colorado Springs in July.

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This year’s recipients were:

Christopher Kellner, MD (left) – Fellow, Mount Sinai Hospital – “The Intra-Arterial Delivery of Modified Human Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Treat Cerebral Vasospasm Through the LArginine/NO Pathway in the Human Placenta Flow Model”

Cameron McDougall, MD (right) – Fellow, University of Texas Southwestern – “Next Joe Niekro Research GrantGeneration Bran Arteriovenous Malformation Model”

Alim Mitha, MD – University of Calgary – “Intravenous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Aneurysm Formation”

(Dr. Mitha was unable to attend the meeting and therefore not pictured.

Congratulations to Drs. Kellner, McDougall and Mitha from all of us at the Joe Niekro Foundation™!

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16
May
16

May is Stroke Awareness Month

ANYONE can have a stroke, so EVERYONE should be prepared!

A stroke, sometimes called a brain attack, occurs when a blockage stops the flow of blood to the brain or when a blood vessel in or around the brain bursts. Strokes can and do occur in people of all ages. In fact, nearly a quarter of all strokes occur in people younger than age 65.

Each year, almost 800,000 strokes occur in the United States.

Every minute counts when you’re having a stroke!  For every minute after a stroke occurs before treatment, 1.9 million neurons are affected.  In most cases, this causes some form of permanent damage.

Recognizing the Signs of Stroke

F.A.S.T is an easy way to remember the sudden signs of stroke.  When you spot the signs, you’ll know you need to call 911 right away.

FFace Drooping – Does one side of the face droop of is numb?  Ask the person to smile.  Is the person’s smile uneven?

AArm Weakness – Is one are weak or numb?  Ask the person to raise both arms.  Does one arm drift downward?

SSpeech Difficulty – Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand?  Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence to see if it is repeated correctly?

TTime to call 911 – If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if they go away, call 9-1-1 and get the person to the hospital immediately.  Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared.

Lowering Your Risk for Stroke

Demographic factors such as family history, age, sex, and race/ethnicity can all play a role in an individual’s stroke risk. Regardless of your background, however, there are several things you can do to lower your chances of having a stroke.

  • Control your Blood Pressure – More than half of the world’s stroke deaths are caused by elevated blood pressure levels.
  • Manage your Cholesterol 
  • Don’t smoke – cigarette smoking contributes to one in every five strokes in the US.
  • Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy weight
  • Eat a healthy diet that’s low in sodium.
  • Prevent or control diabetes.
  • Limit your alcohol – Fewer than two drinks per day for men, or one drink per day for women.



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